Urology Today.net

Site updated at Thursday, 12 May 2016

Common Urological Problems

Radical Prostatectomy

Prostate cancer patients treated with robotic-assisted surgery can expect low recurrence of cancer

A first-ever, long-term study of patients who underwent robot-assisted surgery to remove their cancerous prostates found that nearly 87 percent of them had no recurrence of the disease after five years.

The findings were reported in this month’s issue of the European Urology journal by a team of Henry Ford Hospital researchers led by… Prostate cancer patients treated with robotic-assisted surgery can expect low recurrence of cancer   



70 percent of prostate cancer patients on ADT gain significant weight in first year

Seventy per cent of men who received androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) after surgery to remove their prostate gland gained significant weight in the first year, putting on an average of 4.2kg, according to a paper in the March issue of the urology journal BJUI.

Researchers studied the recorded weights of 132 men who underwent radical… 70 percent of prostate cancer patients on ADT gain significant weight in first year   



Researchers find anatomic differences after robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy

Researchers from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) have concluded that the anatomy of the pelvis following robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy

(RARP) is considerably different when compared to the anatomy of the pelvis following an open prostatectomy (OP). These findings, which are the first to ever compare pelvic anatomy following RARP and OP surgery, may… Researchers find anatomic differences after robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy   



Advanced-stage prostate cancer patients experience 20-year survival rates with surgery

Long-term survival rates for patients with advanced prostate cancer suggest they can be good candidates for surgery, Mayo Clinic researchers have found. Their study found a 20-year survival rate for 80 percent of patients diagnosed with cancer that has potentially spread beyond the prostate, known as cT3 prostate cancer, and treated with radical prostatectomy,… Advanced-stage prostate cancer patients experience 20-year survival rates with surgery   



Prostate cancer surgery better at teaching hospitals

Prostate cancer patients who undergo radical prostatectomy get better results at teaching hospitals than at non-academic medical institutions, according to the findings of an international study led by researchers at Henry Ford Hospital.

“While our findings do not imply that teaching hospitals always provide better care than others, it is obvious that teaching hospitals… Prostate cancer surgery better at teaching hospitals   



Nerve sparing helps most prostate cancer patients to have same orgasms as before surgery

The vast majority of men who have a prostate cancer operation can retain their ability to orgasm if the surgery is carried out without removing the nerves that surround the prostate gland like a hammock, according to a study in the February issue of the urology journal BJUI.

American researchers from Cornell University, New… Nerve sparing helps most prostate cancer patients to have same orgasms as before surgery   



Quality of care, other issues may cause worse results in black prostate cancer surgery patients

Black prostate cancer patients may not be getting the same quality of care as white patients, according to a first-of-its-kind study by researchers at Henry Ford Hospital who found racial disparities in the results of surgery to remove diseased prostates.

While it is possible that anatomical differences or tumor characteristics may explain why the… Quality of care, other issues may cause worse results in black prostate cancer surgery patients   



Patients’ race linked to prostate surgery quality

Black men needing surgery for advanced prostate cancer seem to have worse outcomes than white men, according to a new study.

Based on data collected from hospitals in three states, black men who had their prostates removed were more likely to need blood transfusions, stay in the hospital longer and die while hospitalized compared… Patients’ race linked to prostate surgery quality   



Stat5 predicts outcomes for prostate cancer patients after radical prostatectomy

Men who had high levels of the activated Stat5 protein in their prostate cancer after a radical prostatectomy were more likely to have a recurrence or die from the disease compared to men who had little to no presence of the growth protein, according to a recent study published in Human Pathology by Jefferson’s… Stat5 predicts outcomes for prostate cancer patients after radical prostatectomy   



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