Urology Today.net

Site updated at Thursday, 12 May 2016

Common Urological Problems

Kidney Injury

Roche’s diet drug tied to kidney damage

In another blow to diet drugs, Canadian researchers are reporting a link between Roche’s Xenical and an increase in kidney injuries.

Tapping into healthcare databases from the province of Ontario, they found that 0.5 percent of new orlistat users were hospitalized for kidney problems in the year before starting on the drug. Over the… Roche’s diet drug tied to kidney damage   



New Biomarker Improves Acute Kidney Injury Diagnosis

A new biomarker-based diagnostic test is more effective than the current best practice for early detection of adverse outcomes after acute kidney injury (AKI), which can be fatal for an estimated 50 percent of the critically ill patients who get the condition.

A multi-center study to be published April 26 in the Journal of… New Biomarker Improves Acute Kidney Injury Diagnosis   



Markers Warn of Progressive Kidney Problems After Heart Surgery

Blood and urine markers can indicate which patients with an abrupt kidney injury following heart surgery will experience progressive kidney problems, according to a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the American Society Nephrology (JASN). Testing for these markers soon after surgery could help doctors protect the health of patients’… Markers Warn of Progressive Kidney Problems After Heart Surgery   



Having one kidney shouldn’t block kids from sports

As someone who promotes health, physician Matt Grinsell didn’t like the idea of telling patients to avoid playing sports like football or basketball.

But that is what many doctors suggest for the 1 in 1,500 children born with a single kidney. The fear is they could catastrophically damage the organ, leading them to need… Having one kidney shouldn’t block kids from sports   



Lower chloride use in intravenous fluids for critically ill patients may lower risk of kidney injury

In a pilot study assessing the effect of different levels of chloride in intravenous fluids administered to critically ill patients in an intensive care unit, restricting the amount of chloride administration was associated with a significant decrease in the incidence of acute kidney injury and the use of renal replacement therapy, according to a… Lower chloride use in intravenous fluids for critically ill patients may lower risk of kidney injury   



Mayo Clinic-Led Study Identifies Biomarkers for Early Risk Assessment of Acute Kidney Injury

Acute kidney injury strikes large numbers of hospitalized patients, including those with no prior kidney-related illness, and is one of the most costly and deadly conditions affecting critically ill patients. Findings published today in Critical Care from a Mayo Clinic-led, multicenter study identify two biomarkers of acute kidney injury that can be easily measured… Mayo Clinic-Led Study Identifies Biomarkers for Early Risk Assessment of Acute Kidney Injury   



journal nature1 - hormone-deprivation therapy1 - male potency1 - congenital urinary tract defects1 - dehydration1 - burning2 - hereditary renal diseases1 - cystic anomalies1 - urologist1 - hemodialysis therapy1 - transurethral resection1 - mesonephric duct1 - harvard medical school2 - anus1 - mount sinai1 - sexual changes1 - dysmorphia1 - low-grade prostate cancer2 - myocardial infarction1 - low-calorie diet1 - swimming1 - obesity5 - systems biology1 - renal arteries2 - renal carcinoid1 - adolescent obesity1 - protein flt11 - renal fibrosis1 - prostate treatment system1 - chronic interstitial nephritis1 -